My Paternal Moravian Grand Uncle, Robert Albert Mazac, Sr, Texas

[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother], Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905. Emigrated from Vsetine, Moravia in June 1892, and arrived August 1892 in Ellis Island, New York, and went by ship to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Texas area.
(courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, TX.)

Birth: Mar. 20, 1890, Moravia
Death: Feb. 24, 1983, Houston, Harris County, Texas

Name:Robert Mazek
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse’s Name:Sophia Pavelka
Spouse’s Birth Date:
Spouse’s Birthplace:
Spouse’s Age:
Event Date:22 May 1911
Event Place:Williamson County, Texas
Father’s Name:
Mother’s Name:
Spouse’s Father’s Name:
Spouse’s Mother’s Name:
Race:
Marital Status:Unknown
Previous Wife’s Name:
Spouse’s Race:
Spouse’s Marital Status:Single
Spouse’s Previous Husband’s Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number:M00021-0
System Origin:Texas-VR
GS Film number:1007905
Reference ID:2:3X5L1RX
Citing this Record
“Texas, Marriages, 1837-1973,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FXSY-YQS : accessed 03 Apr 2013), Robert Mazek and Sophia Pavelka, 22 May 1911.

Emigrated from Moravia in November 1891. LEO BACA’S BOOK ON CZECH IMMIGRATION: MARIE MAZAC, AGE 29, ARRIVED ON JAN. 19, 1892 IN NEW YORK ON THE SHIP EIDER FROM MORAVIA, WITH ROZALIE AGE 8, ROBERT AGE 2, AND JOSEF AGE 1/2 [6 MONTHS] BOUND FOR TEXAS. IMMIGRATION PAPERS SHOW MAZAC, MARIE, DCERA TOMASE DUDIKA, DOMKARE V MALE BYSTRICI A JEHO MANZELKY EVY CHLEVESTANOVE.

Family links:
Parents:
Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Spouse:
Sophie Pavelka Mazac (1891 – 1965)

Married: 22 May 1911 in Granger, Williamson, Texas 

Children:
Mary Mazac (1923 – 1923)

Adolph Mazac (1926 – 1988)

Siblings:
Rozalie Mazac Havelka (1881 – 1949)
Albert Adolph Mazac (1884 – 1963)
Anton Mazac (1885 – 1887)
Andrew Mazac (1886 – 1888)
Joe #1 Mazac (1887 – 1888)
Steve Mazac (1888 – 1888)
Johnny Mazac (1889 – 1889)
Joseph Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
Johnny #2 Mazac (1893 – 1898)
Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)*
Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)*
Eva Christine Mazac McCord (1896 – 1975)
Emma Rosa Mazac Strmiska (1896 – 1985)
Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)
John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
Alberta Bertha Mazac Foyt (1900 – 1987)
Olga Angeline Mazac Kovar (1901 – 1971)
Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)


Burial:
Saint Rose of Lima Cemetery
Schulenburg
Fayette County
Texas, USA

Created by: Skip Farrow
Record added: Jan 28, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 124296651

My Paternal Moravian Grand Uncle Frank Joseph Mazac, Texas

Bessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, 1910, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Bessie, John, Effie, and Frank MAZAC, Williamson County, Texas, about 1912.

Birth: Sep. 15, 1902
Corn Hill
Williamson County
Texas, USA

Death: Aug. 25, 1990
Crosby
Harris County
Texas, USA 

Grandson of Georg (Jiriho/Jiri) Mazac & Annie Marie (Skybarove) Mazac of Vsetine, Morava (Moravia).

Son of Jan “John” Mazac & Annie Marie (Dudika) Mazac from Vsetin and Hrozenkova, Morava (Moravia), who emigrated in August 1892, and settled in Granger and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas area.

Beloved Brother of Elizabeth “Bessie” Annie (Mazac) Frederick, my Grandmother.

Husband of Annie Hermina “Minnie” (Uherek) Mazac. Married on 2 December 1926 in Harris County, Texas.

Name: Frank Mazac
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse’s Name: Annie Uherek
Spouse’s Birth Date:
Spouse’s Birthplace:
Spouse’s Age:
Event Date: 02 Dec 1926
Event Place: Harris County, Texas
Father’s Name:
Mother’s Name:
Spouse’s Father’s Name:
Spouse’s Mother’s Name:
Race:
Marital Status:
Previous Wife’s Name:
Spouse’s Race:
Spouse’s Marital Status: Single
Spouse’s Previous Husband’s Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M00029-5
System Origin: Texas-EASy
GS Film number: 25255
Reference ID: Bk 43 pg 252 #74551

Father of Annie Lou (Robberson) (Vick), Roland, & James Mazac of Crosby, Harris County, Texas.
Attended Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Crosby, Texas.
Frank & Annie leased and ran Texaco gas station on FM 2100, in Crosby, Harris County, Texas, about 1940-1970.

Family links: 
Parents:
Jan “John” Mazac (1863 – 1931)
Annie Marie “Mary” Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Spouse:
Annie Hermina (Uherek) Mazac (1907 – 1983)

Children:
Roland Mazac (1927 – 1947) Their sons, Roland and James Mazac both were killed on 31 October 1947, on the way home from a football game. They played football for the Crosby High School, Crosby, Harris, Texas.
James Mazac (1929 – 1947)

Annie Lou Mazac (Robberson) (Vicks) (1943 – Living)

Siblings:
Rozalie Mazac (Havelka) (1881 – 1949)
Albert Adolph Mazac (1884 – 1963)
Anton Mazac (1885 – 1887)
Andrew Mazac (1886 – 1888)
Joe #1 Mazac (1887 – 1888)
Steve Mazac (1888 – 1888)
Johnny Mazac (1889 – 1889)
Robert Albert Mazac (1890 – 1983)
Josef Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
Johnny #2 Mazac (1893 – 1898)
Marie Mazac (Motloch) (1894 – 1968)
Elizabeth “Bessie” Annie Mazac (Frederick) (1895 – 1977)
Eva Mazac (1896 – 1896)
Emma Rosa Mazac (Strmiska) (1896 – 1985)
Effie Mazac (Hurta) (1898 – 1979)
John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
Alberta Bertha Mazac (Foyt) (1900 – 1987)
Olga Angeline Mazac (Kovar) (1901 – 1971)
Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
Vlasta Mary Mazac (Konecny) (1904 – 1999)

Burial: 
Sacred Heart Cemetery
Barrett
Harris County
Texas, USA 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 10, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 24521387

 

john-mary-mazac-granger-texas-c-1904

Jan “John” & Marie “Mary” Mazac, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, 1904. (back row from left) Bessie, Rosalie, Jan, Albert, Robert. (front row from left)Joseph, Emma, Olga (little girl with headband), Frank, Mary and baby-Vlasta, Marie, and Bertha Mazac.

My Paternal Second Great Moravian Grandparents, Tomas Dudika and Evy Chlevestanove

Tomas Dudika (Dudik)

Birth: 1842, Czech Republic
Death: 1922, Czech Republic
Tomas Dudika (aka Dudik)
Born: 1842 in Mala Bystrici, Hrozenkova, Moravia.Related image
Married: 1861 in Hrozenkov, Moravia to Eve “Evy” Chlevestanove.
Child: Annie Marie “Mary” Dudika (Mazac). Unknown whether they had any other children or not.
Died: about 1922 in Moravia. 
Buried: about 1922 in Moravia (exact location unknown)

Family links:
Spouse:
Evy Chlevestanove Dudika (1843 – 1925)

Children:
Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 05, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 104714465Image result for Hrozenkov, Moravia

Evy (Chlevestanove) Dudika

Birth: 1843, Czech Republic
Death: 1925, Czech Republic
My Paternal Great Great Grandmother, Evy “Eve” (Chlevestanove) Dudika.
Born: 1843 in Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia.
Married: 1861 to Tomas Dudika (Dudik) in Hrozenkova, Moravia.
Child: Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac.
Died: about 1925 in Hrozenkov, Moravia. (exact date and place not known.)Family links:
Spouse:
Tomas Dudika (1842 – 1922)

Children:
Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 05, 2013
Small Bystřice.jpg

Town History

The village was founded around the year. 1620 pasekářských of scattered farmhouses, which are founded subjects from Rožnov estate. 1629 has already made a distinction between the Great (today Wallachian) Bystřicí and Small Bystřicí as they talk about Bystřický. Pasekářské homesteads were established here around since the mid-16th century. The inhabitants were farmers. R. 1657 there were 10 settlements, of which 2 are deserted. On Bystričku created after r. 1656 another 13 tapes. R. 1775 there was a bailiff and 7 farmers (půlláníků), the tributary land there were 32 crofters. In one of the estates was floury mill on one composition, grinder box office and saw the plates, one cottager had one mill on the composition of the volatile water.

After the demise of patrimonial establishment r. 1849 the village was part of the political and judicial district Wallachian Mezirici since. 1960 is part of the district Vsetin.

The village gradually formed these societies: Nuke (est. 1925), a reader-Theatre Choral Society, Fellowship of Catholic local farmers, the local branch of the National Union for the eastern Moravia and local Department of National nuts. Your local organization here has MS. People’s Party.

Amateur Theatre Association (photo: S. Kubjátová archive) 

Teachers initially attending to the village of Wallachian Bystřice, taught three times a week, teachers receive 68 Cr. for each pupil per year. In 1867 the school was to be built, but hindered the denominational differences. Moravian Governor’s Office decided to r. 1868 to establish two school districts. At that time it was built school buildings on Santa’s for Catholics, Protestants rented a room in the hill Okluce sharp. After r. In 1874 the school was santa declared public. School was canceled r. , 1971.

Since. 1870 has been consulted on the establishment of other schools. School construction, called in the valley was completed in May, 1883. R was canceled. 1978, and the village was then connected to the circuit primary school in Wallachian Bystrica.

Small Bystřice half the population was Catholic and half of evangelical religion, as evidenced by the state of r. 1900, when the village was 384 Catholics and 385 Protestants. Catholics were přifařeni to Wallachian Bystřice and Protestants belonged to the parish in Great Lhota.

Subsistence population had by far the greatest importance to agriculture, before the mid-19th century and livestock after salašnickém method. R. 1900 cadastral municipality covers an area of 1091 ha, of which 369 forests, fields 340, 311 pastures, meadows and gardens 66 5 ha. Of livestock in the same year, 25 horses, 361 head of cattle, 117 sheep and 46 pieces of sheep.

R. 1960 was based collective farm. R. 1974 was merged with the collective farm collective farm and small Bystřice reservoir located in Bystřičce.

Besides agriculture formed a supplementary source of livelihood mainly work in the woods, traditional production of wooden furniture, shingles, pocket knives, and scourges Okri bread. R. 1923 there was a pub with a butcher and newsagent, blacksmith and farrier, Tailor, 2 krupařské shops, 2 grocery stores and manufacturers rake and barrows. R. 1957 was erected grocery consumer cooperatives Unity to santa and Unity was another shop since. In 1963 Kocib.

Restaurant U Kocib (photo: S. Kubjátová archive) Of the listed buildings in Little Bystřici timbered belfry to santa. Not far from the monument to the fallen Soviet radio operators Timochinové A. and V. Kolomacký of 1 MS. partisan brigade Jan Zizka.

My Paternal Moravian Great Aunt Rozalie “Rosie” (Mazac) Havelka

Rosie (Havelka) Mazac, Annie Marie Dudika (Mazac), and Marie Mazac (Motloch), Granger, Williamson County, circa 1900'

Rosie (Havelka) Mazac, Annie Marie “Mary” Dudika (Mazac), and Marie Mazac (Motloch), Granger, Williamson County, circa 1900’s.

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, her granddaughter, Rosie Havelka (Nemec), & her daughter, Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, boarding train, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, 1920’s

Rozalie “Rosie” (Mazac) Havelka

Birth:
March 19, 1881

Austria-Moravia

Death:
July 5, 1949

Taylor, Williamson County, Texas

Family links:

Parents:
Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Spouse:
Frantisek Havelka (1879 – 1940)

Children:
Josef Havelka (1902 – 1989)
Rosie Havelka Nemec (1906 – 1963)
Frank P Havelka (1911 – 1950)
Louis Joseph Havelka (1912 – 1995)
Stanislav Joseph Havelka (1914 – 1983)
Vlasta Joanna Havelka Nemec Michalek (1916 – 2011)

Siblings:
Albert Adolph Mazac (1884 – 1963)
Anton Mazac (1885 – 1887)
Andrew Mazac (1886 – 1888)
Joe #1 Mazac (1887 – 1888)
Steve Mazac (1888 – 1888)
Johnny Mazac (1889 – 1889)
Robert Albert Mazac (1890 – 1983)
Joe Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)

Johnny #2 Mazac (1893-1898)

Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)
Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
Emma Rosa Mazac Strmiska (1896 – 1985)
Baby Mazac (1896 – 1896)
Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)
John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
Alberta Bertha Mazac Foyt (1900 – 1987)
Olga Angeline Mazac Kovar (1901 – 1971)
Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)

Burial:
Saint Mary’s Catholic Cemetery
Taylor
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section 2

Maintained by: Yvonne
Originally Created by: John Christeson
Record added: May 26, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 27094047

praying_hands

All my Moravian ancestors had praying hands on their headstones, they were Catholic.

john-mary-mazac-granger-texas-c-1904

Jan & Marie Mazac, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, 1904. (back row from left) Bessie, Rosalie, Jan, Albert, Robert. Family of Rozalie “Rosie” (Mazac) Havelka (not in pic)Rosie married in 1901 to Frantisek Havelka.[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother], Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905. Emigrated from Vsetin, Moravia in June 1891, and arrived August 1891 in Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Texas area. (courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, TX.) (front row from left) Joseph, Emma, Olga, Frank, Mary and baby, Vlasta, Marie, and Bertha Mazac.

My Paternal Moravian Grandparents: Charles “Charlie” Frederick & Elizabeth “Bessie” Annie (Mazac) Frederick, Texas

The Williamson County Courthouse located at 30...Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius_Catholic_Church_Granger-Texas

Seal of Williamson County, Texas

My Paternal Grandmother was Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac Frederick, and she was the Matriarch of the Frederick family. She was born in Granger, Williamson County, Texas in 1895. Charlie and Bessie obtained their marriage license in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas.

Name Charlie Frederick
Spouse’s Name Annie B. Mazac
Event Date 12 Oct 1914
Event Place   Williamson, Texas
 Citing this Record

“Texas Marriages, 1837-1973,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FX73-Z86 : 5 December 2014), Charlie Frederick and Annie B. Mazac, 12 Oct 1914; citing , Williamson, Texas, , reference 2:1FZK0L0; FHL microfilm 1,007,899.

They married on October 12, 1914 in Williamson County, Texas.  Charlie and Bessie were both Catholics.  They resided in Taylor, Texas for the U.S. Census for 1920. They rented a house at 210 Davis Street. I still have not figured out why Agnes was not on the 1920 Census but a son Barnie age 4 (my family never said a word about them having a son that age), and Anita age 3 was. I did find records for a Jeromie Frederick that was born in 1919 and died in 1919. ????

name:Charlie Fredrick
residence: Taylor, Williamson, Texas
estimated birth year:1892
age:28
birthplace:Europe
relationship to head of household:Self
gender:Male
race:W
marital status:Married
father’s birthplace:Russia Poland
mother’s birthplace:Texas
film number:1821857
digital folder number:4390329
image number:00875
sheet number:2
 HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
selfCharlie FredrickM28yEurope
wifeBessie FredrickF24yTexas
sonBarnie FredrickM4yTexas
dauAneta FredrickF3yTexas

name: Charlie Fredrick
residence: , Williamson, Texas
estimated birth year: 1892
age: 28
birthplace: Europe
relationship to head of household: Self
gender: Male
race: W
marital status: Married
father’s birthplace: Russia Poland
mother’s birthplace: Texas
film number: 1821857
digital folder number: 4390329
image number: 00875
sheet number: 2
Household Gender Age Birthplace
self Charlie Fredrick M 28y Europe
wife Bessie Fredrick F 24y Texas
son Barnie Fredrick M 4y Texas
dau Aneta Fredrick F 3y Texas
Citing this Record
“United States Census, 1920,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MHTG-N2D : accessed 29 Jan 2013), Charlie Fredrick, , Williamson, Texas; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 2A, family 29, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821857.

My Grandmother loved pink, so I posted the pink background of the Moravian-Czech flower. She liked artificial because she said they never die.

She lost my Grandfather in 1947 to Stomach Cancer, and she had a hard life raising her five children on her own. Grandma was an excellent cook, a good mother, and she also grew a garden with her sons, Woodrow and Charles for years to help feed the family. Bessie worked in the Cafeteria for Crosby I.S.D. for years.

Charles F. “Charlie” Frederick also known as Karel Fredrich, and Charles Fredrick, was born on April 20, 1892 in Mala Lhota, Vsetina, Moravia and he emigrated from Moravia in 1894 to New York, and then on to Austin, Travis County, Texas. His last known residence according to his naturalization papers was in Pusta Polom, Ostrava, Moravian-Silesia. He was a poor farmer and a cobbler. My father told me that he helped the other Moravian’s to learn English. He was an avid reader, and read his Bible everyday. 

Obec Pusta Polom, Ostrava, Moravian-Silesia

potvrzeni

Pusta_Polom_CoA_Moravia

My grandfather was a a Private in the 23rd. machine gun regiment in the Legionnaire Czechoslovak Foreign Army in America. He received his American citizenship papers by serving in the Czechoslovak Army during World War I in France for the United States and Allies.  According to the  1930 U. S. Census for Harris County, Texas, Charles Fredrick emigrated in 1894 from Czechoslovakia. 

Bessie’s parents, Jan “John” Mazac emigrated in 1891, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac emigrated in 1892 to Ellis Island, New York, New York. They were poor farm laborers. 

My Paternal Bohemian Great Uncle, Adolph Edward Konecny

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Emma Strmiska, Matilda & John Mazac, Adolph & Vlasta (Mazac) Konecny, Granger, Williamson, Texas

Adolph Konecny & Vlasta Mary (Mazac) Konecny, Crosby, Harris County, Texas, c. 1940’s.

Adolph Edward Konecny, Agnes Rainie (Frederick) and husband, Edward “Eddie” John Christ, Austin, Travis, Texas, Austin, Travis, Texas, 1933.

 

Vlasta Mary (Mazac) Konecny, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, Charles Frederick Jr, Adolph Edward Konecny, Woodrow Frederick @ 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Harris, Texas, the home of LeRoy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick, c. 1950’s.

Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny and Adolph Edward Konecny, 9014 Talcott Street, Houston, Texas.

Birth:  Nov. 21, 1896
Fayetteville
Fayette County
Texas, USA
Death:  Aug., 1982
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Son of Frank Joseph Konecny & Rozalia “Rozara” (Mikulencak) Konecny.

Nationality: Moravian

Religion: Catholic

Husband of Vlasta Mary (Mazac) Konecny.
Father of Mary Gladys Konecny (Barnes).

Grandfather of Paulette Jean Barnes (Smith), and Stacey Michelle Barnes (White) (Welch).

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Vsetin, Moravia the Homeland of my MAZAC Ancestors

MAZAC Family Genealogy

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/93/Kostel_evangelick%C3%BD_(Vset%C3%ADn).JPGVsetín CastleOfficial seal of VsetínVsetín is located in Czech Republichttp://www.vyletnik.cz/images/profily/mesto/vsetin/foto/vsetin-524.jpg

Vsetín (Czech pronunciation:[ˈfsɛciːn]) is a town in Zlín Region of the Czech Republic. It has around 28,500 inhabitants and lies on the Vsetínská Bečvariver.

The area around Vsetín, called Vsetínsko, is spread out on the foothills of the Vsetín, Hostýn and Vizovice Highlands around the Bečva River. This area features the remains of log houses and cultural monuments of significant importance mainly in Vsetín itself.

The folk culture has been kept alive by Wallachian song and dance groups for many decades. Originally a small town, Vsetín has become an important centre of industrial, economic, cultural and sports life during the last century.

VB36 Vsetínská Bečva nad mostem v Janové.jpg

Vsetínská Bečva is a river in the Czech Republic, the left tributary of the Bečva River. It originates in the Javorníky mountain range at the elevation of 896 m and flows for 59.38 km to Valašské Meziříčí, where it joins…

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My Maternal Moravian Grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac Frederick

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas. Shared by me her niece

Bessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas

(from left) Bessie, Effie, & Mary, the Mazac sisters, C. 1913, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Birth:  Oct. 12, 1895
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA

Death:  Mar. 26, 1977
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

My paternal grandmother. Family and friends knew her as Bessie. Hard working Moravian, Catholic, wife of Charlie F. “Karel Fredrick” Frederick. Obtained marriage license in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, and Bessie and Charlie married on 12 October 1914, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. She graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She…

View original post 954 more words

My Paternal Grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac (Frederick)

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas. Shared by me her niece.

Bessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas.

(from left) Bessie, Effie, & Mary, the Mazac sisters, C. 1913, Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

Birth:  Oct. 12, 1895
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Death:  Mar. 26, 1977
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

My paternal grandmother. Family and friends knew her as Bessie. Hard working Moravian, Catholic, wife of Charlie F. “Karel Fredrick” Frederick. Obtained marriage license in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, and Bessie and Charlie married on 12 October 1914, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

She graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She…

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My Moravian Ancestor, Leroy Eugene Frederick, My Daddy

LeRoy Eugene Frederick-U.S. Navy-1945

Leroy Eugene Frederick, U.S. Navy, San Diego, California, World War II, 1943-1945, from Houston, Harris County, Texas. Son of Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac and Charlie Frederick. 

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Map of USA with Texas highlighted Map of USA with Texas highlighted (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Harris County 1910 Courthouse Español...

Leroy Eugene “Lee” Frederick
 
Birth: Mar. 6, 1926
Crosby
Harris County
Texas, USA
Death: Nov. 16, 2006
Crockett
Houston County
Texas, USA

“Services for Leroy Eugene Frederick 80, of Grapeland, Texas will be at 1 p.m. Monday at Liberty Hill United Methodist Church with Tommy Hutto officiating. Daddy & Barbara resided in Percilla, TX. Burial will follow in Augusta Cemetery under the direction of Bailey & Foster, of Grapeland. Mr. Frederick died Thursday at East Texas Medical Center in Crockett. Condolence calls will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Bailey & Foster Funeral Home, Grapeland, Texas.” [Palestine Herald-Press Nov 18,2006]

Leroy was raised Catholic as all his sisters and brothers were. They attended the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, in Crosby, TX.

When my Daddy married Barbara he was baptized later in life as Methodist. He helped build the…

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Strong Spiritual Moravian Women in my Family

I BELIEVE SOMEONE, IF ONLY ONE, WILL BE INTERESTED TO KNOW WHERE THE MAZAC, FREDERICK, DUDIKA, KOVAR, HAVELKA, MAREK, VOLEK, MARTINKAS, STRMISKA, HURTA, AND ALL THE OTHER MORAVIAN AND BOHEMIAN ANCESTORS WERE DESCENDED FROM.
I AM INTERESTED AM I NO ONE?
I AM TRYING TO WRITE THIS BOOK FOR ALL THE WOMEN WHO WERE UNABLE TO SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.
GOD BLESS THE STRONG WOMEN, THE SURVIVORS, LIKE MY GRANDMOTHER, BESSIE MAZAC FREDERICK, AND VLASTA MAZAC KONECNY, AGNES FREDERICK CHRIST, AND EMMA ROSA MAZAC KOVAR.
THE WOMEN HAD THE BABIES, FED THE BABIES, AND LOVED THE BABIES, AND SOME OF THE WOMEN EVEN GREW THE FOOD, AND COOKED THE FOOD THAT KEPT THEIR FAMILIES FROM GOING HUNGRY. THE WOMEN KEPT THE FAMILIES TOGETHER. THERE WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN ANY FAMILY WITHOUT WOMEN!!

Emma (Mazac) Strmiska, Matilda (Krampota) & John Mazac, Adolph & Vlasta (Mazac) Konecny, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, about 1920’s courtesy of Agnes Rainie (Frederick) Christ posthumously, Houston, Texas.

 Emma Rosa Mazac Strmiska, my paternal grandmother’s sister. 

Birth: Oct. 11, 1896

Corn Hill
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Death: Sep. 20, 1985
Williamson County
Texas, USA

Daughter of Jan “John” Mazac and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac.
Married Thomas “Tom” Frank Strmiska in 1914 in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

They had nine children together: Albert James, Mary Elizabeth (Simcik), Frances (Harris), Martha B (Martinka), Dorothy Ann “Dot” (Kovar), Elizabeth “Lillie” T (Licka), Lucile, Theodore “Ted” T, and John Alvin “Johnny” Sr. Strmiska.

1900 CENSUS FOR CORN HILL, WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TEXAS SHOWS JAN AND MARIE MAZAC WITH CHILDREN: ROZALIE AGE 19, MARIE AGE 6, ALBERT AGE 16, ROBERT AGE 10, JOSEF AGE 9, BESSIE AGE 5, EMMA AGE 4, EFFIE AGE 2, JOHN AGE 1, AND BERTHA MAZAC.

Name: Emma Strmiska
Titles and Terms:
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1920
Event Place: Justice Precinct 2, Williamson, Texas, United States
District: 155
Gender: Female
Age: 20
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Race (Original): White
Can Read: Yes
Can Write: Yes
Relationship to Head of Household: Wife
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Wife
Own or Rent:
Birth Year (Estimated): 1900
Birthplace: Texas
Immigration Year:
Father’s Birthplace: Moravia
Mother’s Birthplace: Moravia
Sheet Number and Letter: 10A
Household ID: 181
Line Number: 43
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T625
GS Film number: 1821857
Digital Folder Number: 004390329
Image Number: 00405
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head Tom Strmiska M 29 Moravia
Wife Emma Strmiska F 20 Texas
Son Albert Strmiska M 5 Texas
Daughter Mary Strmiska F 3 Texas
Daughter Francis Strmiska F 1 Texas

Name: Emma Strmiska
Titles and Terms:
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1930
Event Place: Precinct 2, Williamson, Texas, United States
District: 0009
Gender: Female
Age: 33
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Race (Original): White
Relationship to Head of Household: Wife
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Wife
Birth Year (Estimated): 1897
Birthplace: Texas
Immigration Year:
Father’s Birthplace: Czechoslovakia
Mother’s Birthplace: Czechoslovakia
Sheet Number and Letter: 5B
Household ID: 114
Line Number: 100
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T626
Affiliate Film Number: 2411
GS Film number: 2342145
Digital Folder Number: 004547390
Image Number: 00529
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head Thomas Strmiska M 39 Czechoslovakia
Wife Emma Strmiska F 33 Texas
Son Albert Strmiolee M 14 Texas
Daughter Mary Strmiolee F 13 Texas
Daughter Frances Strmiolee F 11 Texas
Daughter Margie Strmiolee F 8 Texas
Daughter Davis Strmiolee F 5 Texas
Daughter Elizabeth Strmiska F 4 Texas

Name: Emma Strimska
Titles and Terms:
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1940
Event Place: Justice Precinct 2, Williamson, Texas, United States
Gender: Female
Age: 42
Marital Status: Married
Race (Original): White
Race: White
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Wife
Relationship to Head of Household: Wife
Birthplace: Texas
Birth Year (Estimated): 1898
Last Place of Residence: Rural, Williamson, Texas
District: 246-11
Family Number: 175
Sheet Number and Letter: 10A
Line Number: 14
Affiliate Publication Number: T627
Affiliate Film Number: 4166
Digital Folder Number: 005458080
Image Number: 00382
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head Tom Strimska M 49 Czechoslovakia
Wife Emma Strimska F 42 Texas
Son Albert Strimska M 25 Texas
Daughter Mary Strimska F 23 Texas
Daughter Francis Strimska F 22 Texas
Daughter Martha Strimska F 18 Texas
Daughter Dorothy Strimska F 16 Texas
Daughter Elizabeth Strimska F 14 Texas
Son Theor*E Strimska M 10 Texas
Son Johnny Strimska M 4 Texas

Given Name: Emma
Middle Name:
Surname: Strmiska
Name Suffix:
Birth Date: 11 October 1896
Social Security Number: 456-86-2127
State: Texas
Last Place of Residence: Williamson, Texas
Previous Residence Postal Code: 76530
Event Date: 20 September 1985
Age: 89

Family links:
Parents:
Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Spouse:
Thomas Frank Strmiska (1889 – 1971)

Siblings:
Rozalie Mazac Havelka (1881 – 1949)
Albert Adolph Mazac (1884 – 1963)
Anton Mazac (1885 – 1887)
Andrew Mazac (1886 – 1888)
Joe #1 Mazac (1887 – 1888)
Steve Mazac (1888 – 1888)
Johnny Mazac (1889 – 1889)
Robert Albert Mazac (1890 – 1983)
Joe Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
Johnny #2 Mazac (1893 – 1898)
Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)
Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
Baby Mazac (1896 – 1896)
Emma Rosa Mazac Strmiska (1896 – 1985)
Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)*
John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)*
Alberta Bertha Mazac Foyt (1900 – 1987)*
Olga Angeline Mazac Kovar (1901 – 1971)*
Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)*
Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)

Burial: 
Holy Cross Cemetery
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section I Row 7 

Maintained by: TEXAS TUDORS
Originally Created by: John Christeson
Record added: Feb 08, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 24484220

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Moravian Slovakia (Czech: Moravské Slovácko) or Slovácko is a cultural region in the southeastern part of the Czech Republic

My Paternal Grandfather, Karel Fredrick also known as Charles Frederick, was born in Mala Lhota, Moravia on 20 April 1892. My Paternal Great Grandfather, Jan Mazac was born on 28 April 1863 in Usti, Vsetine, Moravia.

Moravian Slovakia (Czech: Moravské Slovácko) or Slovácko is a cultural region in the southeastern part of the Czech Republic, Moravia on the border with Slovakia (Czech: Slovensko) and Austria, known for its characteristic folklore, music, wine, costumes and traditions. The area forms part of both the Zlín and South Moravian administrative regions.

Its most important center is the town of Uherské Hradiště which is located on the Morava River. Other important population centers include Uherský Brod, Břeclav, Hodonín, Strážnice and Kyjov. In the 9th century the region of Moravian Slovakia was the centre of the Great Moravian empire.

Native Moravians speak Moravian dialects of the Czech language, and the dialects native to this region are influenced by neighboring Slovak speakers, hence the name “Moravian Slovakia.” Due to these cultural and linguistic links to Slovakia, many ethnographers until 20th century used to consider Moravian Slovaks as a people which politically belonged to Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown but ethnographically and culturally to the Slovak ethnic group. Historically, there were also significant numbers of German speakers who also influenced local speech.

Moravians (Czech: Moravané or colloquially Moraváci) are the modern West Slavic inhabitants of the historical land of Moravia, the easternmost part of the Czech Republic, which includes Moravian Slovakia. They speak the two main groups of Moravian dialects (the Central and the Eastern), the transitional Bohemian-Moravian dialect subgroup and standard Czech. There are attempts by few Moravian individuals and organizations to create a distinct “Moravian language”.

 

Spa Town of Karlovy Vary – Czech Republic

My Paternal grandfather, Charles “Charlie” Frederick, also known as Karel Fredrich, was from Polom, Moravia.

Pustá Polom (German: Wüstpohlom) is a village in the Moravian-Silesian Region of the Czech Republic. It has around 1,400 inhabitants and lies 12 km from Opava. The village was first mentioned in a written document in 1238.

There are three towns with protected historical centers. Příbor, the birthplace of Sigmund Freud, was an important center of education for northern Moravia from the 17th century to the first half of the 20th. Nový Jičín, founded under the castle of Starý Jičín, has a well preserved central square dating back to the 14th century, with the Žerotínský château nearby. Štramberk is a unique small town nestled in a valley between lime hills, with many timber houses and the Trúba Spire rising on a hill above the town.

There are many castles and châteaus in the region; the most famous being Hradec nad Moravicí, Raduň, Kravaře and Fulnek. Hukvaldy, in a village of the same name under the Moravian-Silesian Beskids, is one the region’s many castle ruins, known for a musical festival dedicated to the composer Leoš Janáček, who was born there. Another well-known castle ruin is Sovinec under the Hrubý Jeseníks. I would love to be able to travel there one day.

Moravia~Homeland Of My MAZAC and DUDIKA Ancestors

Moravia-Mazac-Pink

My Grandmother loved pink, so I created this for her. Below is Granger, Williamson County, Texas and the John & Mary Mazac’s farm. John is the big man with the hat, Mary is the short lady beside him.

(from right to left) Great Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac, “Emilie Gelner” & “John” Kovar, & Joe Hurta (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Grandpa & Grandma Mazac, Grandma & Grandpa Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back)

My Paternal Grandmother, Bessie, graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She worked in the cafeteria for Crosby I.S.D. in the 1950’s. Bessie was a member of the S.P.J.S.T. and K.J.S.T.

She was a faithful member of the SS. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, in Granger, Williamson County, TX; and the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, in Crosby, TX.

My Grandmother honored her Moravian heritage. Her parents emigrated from Moravia in August 1892 to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas.

Bessie & Charlie were hard working Moravian farmers. They moved to Sheldon, TX before 1926, when my Daddy, LeRoy E. Frederick, was born in Crosby, TX. Daddy taught me how to polka.

My poor grandma had a very hard life. She raised her five living children by herself after grandpa Charlie passed away in 1947. She lost a child son, Jerome Frederick, in 1919 in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. She raised Woodie and Charles all their lives. She told me that they were in a car accident, and were never the same again. Charles would not talk at all for years, then when he did start talking grandma wanted him to shut up.

She tended almost an acre of land with her garden. She had a green thumb. She had all kinds of good vegetables and strawberries too! She canned and put up jelly.

Bessie loved music and dancing. Grandma Frederick always had the best kolaches and soda pop for her Grandkids, when they visited. She was a great cook! I loved to climb her trees and pick strawberries out of her garden, that she and the boys (Charles & Woodrow) Frederick helped her tend.
Daughter of Jan “John” & Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac of Granger, Texas.

Resided in Taylor, Williamson County, Texas in 1920, according to the U.S. Census for Williamson County, Texas.

Children: Agnes “Renie” (Christ), LeRoy “Lee” Eugene, Juanita “Punkin” (Christ), Woodrow “Woodie”, and Charles “Chas” Frederick.

She raised the children by herself after 1947, when Grandpa Charlie died of Stomach Cancer.

Grandma Bessie worked for the Crosby ISD in the cafeteria for years. Everyone loved her. Died of hardening of the arteries and Diabetes.

Grandma Bessie liked pink. She told my mother and me that she liked artificial flowers–because they didn’t die. And, she made my mother promise her, that when she died, mother would make sure that all her grandchildren came to her funeral. Of course, we all did. Having flowers at her families gravesides was important to her.

I volunteered to sponsor the online Sacred Heart Catholic Cemetery to honor her. Grandma Bessie & Grandpa Charlie and Uncle Woodie, Uncle Charles, and Aunt Rainie are all laid to rest there.

Grandma Bessie even as poor as she was, always made sure that all nine (9) of her Grandchildren got something for Christmas. 

Charlie & Bessie Frederick, October 12, 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainnie Frederick (Christ) their daughter.

 

Great Moravia~Homeland of Moravian Ancestors

Bratislava Castle is one of the most prominent structures in its namesake city.

Great Moravia (Czech: Velká Morava, Slovak: Veľká Morava), also Moravia or Great Moravian Empire,[4] was the first West Slavic state to emerge from “the most powerful tribal area in Central Europe“.[5][vague] Its core territories were located on the northern Morava River along the present-day border of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Theories of a Great Moravia situated in the region of the southern Great Morava River have not been widely accepted. The exact date of the founding of the Moravian state is controversial, but it is supposed that the state building process was completed in the early 830s under Mojmir I (r. 820s/830s–846), who is the first known Moravian ruler.

Mojmir and his successor, Rastislav (r. 846–870), initially acknowledged the suzerainty of the Carolingian monarchs, but their fights for independence caused a series of armed conflicts with East Francia beginning in the 840s. Moravia reached its largest territorial extent under Svatopluk I (r. 870–894), who was occasionally styled as king in contemporaneous sources. Although the borders of his empire cannot be exactly determined, he controlled the core territories of Moravia as well as other neighboring regions, including Bohemiaand parts of present-day Hungary and Poland, for some period of his reign. Separatism and internal conflicts emerging after Svatopluk’s death contributed to the fall of Moravia, which was overrun by the Hungarians. The exact date of Moravia’s collapse is unknown, but it occurred in the period between 902 and 907.

Moravia experienced significant cultural development after the arrival in 863 of the mission of Saints Cyril and Methodius, initiated by Prince Rastislav, which introduced a system of writing (the Glagolitic alphabet) and Slavonic liturgy, the latter eventually formally approved by Pope Adrian II.[6] The Glagolitic script and its successor Cyrillic were disseminated to other Slavic countries (particularly Balkan states and Kievan Rus’), charting a new path in their cultural development.

My Paternal Moravian Cousin, Nancy Lou “Elizabeth” Christ Harper

Birth:                     

Jan. 18, 1946
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Charlie, Juanita, Patsy and Nancy Lou Christ, c. 1950’s, Houston, Texas.
Death:

Mar. 17, 2014
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Nancy Lou Elizabeth (Christ) Harper.

Daughter of Charles “Charlie” Edmond Christ and Juanita Elizabeth “Punkin” (Frederick) Christ.

Sister of Patricia “Patsy” Juanita (Christ) Swift.

Resided in Sheldon, Harris, Texas and Royalwood Subdivision, Houston, Texas.

Married: James L. Harper on 21 June 1969 in Harris County, Texas.

Children: None

Name: Nancy Lou Elizabeth Christ
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 18 Jan 1946
Event Place: Harris, Texas
Gender: Female
Father’s Name: Charles Edmond Christ
Mother’s Name: Juanita Elizabeth Frederick
Certificate Number:
Citing this Record
“Texas, Birth Index, 1903-1997,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V8C1-MZ5 : accessed 21 Mar 2014), Nancy Lou Elizabeth Christ, 18 Jan 1946; from “Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997,” index and images, Ancestry.com; citing Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997, (Texas: Texas Department of State Health Services).Wife of James L. Harper.

Name: James L Harper
Name Suffix:
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 21 Jun 1969
Event Place: Harris, Texas, United States
Age: 22
Birth Year (Estimated): 1947
Spouse’s Name: Nancy L Christ
Spouse’s Age: 23
Spouse’s Birth Year (Estimated): 1946
Certificate Number: 071327
Affiliate County Code: 101
Citing this Record
“Texas, Marriages, 1966-2010,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VTR7-FRQ : accessed 21 Mar 2014), James L Harper and Nancy L Christ, 21 Jun 1969; citing Harris, Texas, United States, certificate number 071327, Department of State Health Services, Texas Vital Statistics Unit, Austin, Texas.

Arrangements for Nancy Lou Harper at Forest Park – Lawndale, Houston, Harris County, Texas. Thursday 3.20.14. Rosary and visitation – 5 pm – 9 pm Funeral services Friday 3.21.14 10:00 am

Family links:
Parents:
Charles Edmond Christ (1914 – 1974)
Juanita Elizabeth Frederick Christ (1915 – 2011)

Sibling:
Margie Rae Christ (1938 – 1938)

Burial:
Forest Park Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Mar 20, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 126648465 

My Paternal Grand Uncle, Albert Adolph Mazac

https://i1.wp.com/image1.findagrave.com/photos/2008/119/21074090_120953418678.jpg

[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother],Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905. Emigrated from Vsetine, Moravia in June 1892, and arrived August 1892 in Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas area.
(courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, Harris County, Texas.)

Birth:  1884, Czech Republic
Death:  1963
Taylor
Williamson County
Texas, USA

My Paternal Great Uncle, Albert Mazac was the son of Jan “John” Mazac and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac of Granger, Williamson County, Texas. He was born in 1884 in Usti, Vsetine, Moravia.Brother of Rozalie (Havelka), Anton, Andrew, Joe #1, Steve, Johnny, Robert Albert, Josef Frank “Joe”, Johnny #2, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Frederick), Baby, Emma Rosa (Strminska), Effie (Hurta), Frank Joseph, John Jerry, Alberta “Bertha” (Foyt), Olga Angleine(Kovar) and Vlasta Mary(Konecny).

Albert with his father Jan “John” Mazac emigrated from Moravia in August 1891 to Ellis Island, New York then on to Williamson County, Texas in October 1891 at the age of 7.

1900 CENSUS FOR CORNHILL, WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TEXAS SHOWS JAN AND MARIE MAZAC WITH CHILDREN: ROZALIE AGE 19, MARIE AGE 6, ALBERT AGE 16, ROBERT AGE 10, JOSEF AGE 9, BESSIE AGE 5, EMMA AGE 4, EFFIE AGE 2, JOHN AGE 1, AND BERTHA MAZAC.

I have researched and I have not found whether he married or had children, when he died, or where he exactly was buried.

Family links:
 Parents:
  Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
  Annie Marie Dudika Mazac (1862 – 1939)

Burial:
Unknown
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 06, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 116664773

My Paternal Grand Aunt Vlasta Mary (Mazac) Konecny

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Birth:  Jul. 24, 1904
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Death:  Apr. 28, 1999
Cleveland
Liberty County
Texas, USA 
“A Loving Daughter, A Loving Sister, A Loving Mother. A Loving Grandmother. A Loving Great-Grandmother. A Loving Aunt and Great Aunt. An Everlasting Friend.”

Vlasta was the Moravian daughter of Jan “John” & Annie “Mary” Marie (Dudika) Mazac, of Granger, Williamson County, Texas.Her parents emigrated from Vsetine, Moravia in June 1892. They were hard working farmers. They settled in the Corn Hill, Granger, and Taylor areas in Williamson County, Texas.


She was the wife of Adolph Edward Konecny.She was a devout Catholic. She attended the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Crosby, Harris County, Texas. Vlasta was a Homemaker. Aunt Vlasta dedicated her life to taking care of her family. She was a member of the SPJST.

Vlasta had eleven brothers: Albert, Anton, Andrew, Joe #1, Steve, Johnnie, Robert, Frank, Johnny…

View original post 355 more words

My Paternal Great Grandparents, Jan “John” Mazac and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Granger, Texas, 1904

(from right to left) Great Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac, “Emilie” & “John” Kovar, & Joe Hurta (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother], Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905.

Emigrated from Vsetin, Moravia in June 1892, and arrived August 1892 in Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas area. (courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, Harris County, Texas.)

 

Christmas in the Czech lands – a magical time for children and adults

English: Nativity scenes in Sanok
English: Nativity scenes in Sanok (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christmas in the Czech lands – a magical time for children and adults

09.11.2006
Christmas in the Czech Republic is one of the best times of the year. The streets of towns big and small are bedecked with yuletide decorations and town squares come alive with the hustle and bustle of Christmas markets. Old folk Christmas traditions are revived at open-air museums and children and adults alike stop at the sight of well-crafted figures in nativity scenes with delight in their eyes. Christmas and Advent music can be heard in concert halls, churches, castles and chateaux. A Czech Christmas is above all a time of cheer and friendship so accept our invitation and spend the festive season with us.

The appearance of St Nicholas means Christmas is on its way. While for adults the period leading up to Christmas is like no time at all, children impatiently count off the days on the Advent calendar. This agonizing wait for their Christmas presents is alleviated somewhat by the arrival of St Nicholas, who visits every child in the country on the eve of St Nicholas day December 5. This august figure is traditionally accompanied by an angel and a demon. He may scare the children a bit, but his main task is to give them some small gifts, fruit and sweets. This will be the scene on Charles Square in Třebíč (www.kviztrebic.cz). Christmas markets will be taking place in this UNESCO-listed town December 19 and 20.

The Czechs’ distinctive nativity scenes
The story of Jesus’ birth has always been an inspiration for the creators of nativity scenes. These are made of various materials including wood, ceramics, paper and even gingerbread. Some of the nativity scenes you will discover in the Czech Republic are some of the finest in the world and can be found in churches, museums and open-air museums. The museum in Jindřichův Hradec (www.museum.esnet.cz) houses the largest mechanical scenes in the world – the Krýza Nativity Scene. It took the creator more than 60 years to complete this gargantuan undertaking which holds almost 1400 figures! In Třebechovice pod Orebem (www.betlem.cz) the villagers have even created a Nativity Scene Museum housing nativity scenes from across the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Their most valuable exhibit is the Třebechovice mechanical nativity scene. The prized possession at the Nativity Scene Museum in Karlštejn (www.obeckarlstejn.cz) is the Karlštejn royal nativity scene containing figures representing Czech kings. And be sure not to miss the museum’s exhibition of gingerbread nativity scenes.

Music for Christmas and Advent
Czech classical music is some of the world’s finest cultural heritage and there can be no better Christmas present for fans than special concerts of music for Christmas and Advent which take place at concert halls, markets, churches, castles and chateaux. These will often feature the Czech Christmas Mass called ‘Hej mistře, vstaň bystře’ composed by Jakub Jan Ryba at the end of the 18th century. This year it will be performed twice by the Prague State Opera (www.opera.cz) December 25 and 26. Concerts of organ music with a Christmas theme will also take place December 25 until January 6, 2007 at the Basilica of St James in the Old Town (www.auditeorganum.cz). The popularity of music specially written for Advent and Christmas can be seen from the number of festivals taking place.

 Alphonse Maria Mucha, Moravia FAMILY czech-republic christmas angel

My father’s grandparents were from Vsetine, Moravia, and they emigrated in 1892 to Texas.

Leroy Eugene “Lee” Frederick
Birth:  Mar. 6, 1926
Crosby
Harris County
Texas, USA
Death:  Nov. 16, 2006
Crockett
Houston County
Texas, USA 

“Services for Leroy Eugene Frederick 80, of Grapeland,Houston County, Texas will be at 1 p.m. Monday at Liberty Hill United Methodist Church with Tommy Hutto officiating. Daddy & Barbara resided in Percilla, Houston County, Texas. Burial will follow in Augusta Cemetery under the direction of Bailey & Foster, of Grapeland. Mr. Frederick died Thursday at East Texas Medical Center in Crockett. Condolence calls will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Bailey & Foster Funeral Home, Grapeland, Texas.” [Palestine Herald-Press Nov 18,2006]Leroy was raised Catholic as all his sisters and brothers were. They attended the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, in Crosby, Harris County, Texas. Later in his life he was baptized as Methodist. He helped build the Liberty Hill Methodist Church, in Liberty Hill, Williamson County, Texas.

Leroy was the son of Charlie & Bessie (Mazac) Frederick of Crosby, Harris County, Texas. His ancestors emigrated from Moravia in 1892. He had two sisters, Agnes Rainnie “Renie” (Frederick) Christ and Juanita “Punkin” (Frederick)Christ, both of them resided on Talcott Road, Houston, Harris County, Texas 77049.
He had two brothers, Charles and Woodrow Frederick, who preceded him in death.

Leroy married to first wife, Jean Marie Linderman, 15 Nov. 1947. They had six children by that union, which lasted for twenty one years. Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean [Hyden], Sally Ann [Tudor], Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie[Harrod], and Sarah Kay Frederick [Moore]. Divorced in 1968.

Leroy married Barbara Moore Faulk in 15 Sept. 1969, in Dayton, Texas. She called him Lee.

Barbara had two children, Jeanna and Joey Faulk, from a previous marriage.

Leroy & Barbara had no children from that marriage, which lasted for thirty seven years.

Leroy served in the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard Merchant Marine supply ships for troops. He served in the U.S. Navy from Jan. 1944, until May 18, 1946. He was shipped out to San Diego, California.

Military Service Records show:
[Frederick, Leroy Eugene, service number was 5772117, Seaman 1C, V-6 USNR, Sheldon, Texas.] He was Honorably discharged. He was sent back to Camp Wallace, TX. after World War II ended.

Daddy worked for Brown & Root, Inc, 4100 Clinton Drive, Houston, Texas for [46] forty six years. Started out as a Mechanic’s helper, and retired as Asst. Supt. of the Automotive Dept.

Leroy & Barbara (Moore) Frederick were hosts for several different parks in Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana, etc… after their retirement. In 1995, all the Grandchildren were taken by Leroy’s son, Joseph Frederick & Brenda (Meyers) Frederick, to visit them in South Dakota & Montana.

Leroy was a loving and loyal Son, Brother, Husband, Father, Grandfather, and Great-Grandfather. He is greatly missed!
I am proud to be the daughter of such an honorable and hard working man. 

Family links:
 Parents:
  Charles F Frederick (1892 – 1947)
  Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
 
 Spouse:
  Jean Marie Linderman Mancill (1927 – 2012)
 

Burial:
Augusta Cemetery
Augusta
Houston County
Texas, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21070006
Leroy Eugene Lee Frederick
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
 
Leroy Eugene Lee Frederick

My Paternal Great Grandmother~Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika)~Moravia

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka, & her Mom-Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, boarding train, Granger, TX, c. 1920’s.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

Birth: 

Apr. 2, 1862

 Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia

Death:  Mar. 21, 1939
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA 

My Paternal Great Grandmother, Daughter of Tomas “Tom” Dudika (also known as Dudik) & Evy “Eve” (Chlevestanove) Dudika of Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia.Wife of Jan “John” Mazac, Mother of 21 children.
Emigrated on 19 January 1892 from Moravia to Ellis Island, New York, New York. Moved to Texas to meet her husband, John Mazac.

[LEO BACA’S BOOK ON CZECH IMMIGRATION: 
MARIE MAZAC, AGE 29, ARRIVED ON JAN. 19, 1892 IN NEW YORK ON THE SHIP EIDER FROM MORAVIA, WITH ROZALIE AGE 8, ROBERT AGE 2, AND JOSEF AGE 1/2 [6 MONTHS] BOUND FOR TEXAS. IMMIGRATION PAPERS SHOW MAZAC, MARIE, DCERA TOMASE DUDIKA, DOMKARE V MALE BYSTRICI A JEHO MANZELKY EVY CHLEVESTANOVE.]

Settled in Granger, Taylor, and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas areas. 

Children: Rosalie, Albert, Anton, Andrew, Joe #1, Steve, Johnnie, Robert Albert, Frank, Johnny #2, Marie, Elizabeth Annie (Bessie), Emma, Effie, Baby (sex unknown), John Joseph, Alberta “Bertha”, Olga, Frank Joseph, and Vlasta Mary Mazac.

Loving wife, Mother, Grandmother, and Great Grandmother.
Hardworking Czech-Moravian, farmer’s wife, and a devout Catholic. Member of the SPJST. 

Member of the St.Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. Mary & John Mazac helped build the St. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

Note: Burial Information taken from Williamson County Cemetery Book, Vol.1. 

Family links: 
 Parents:
  Tomas Dudika (1842 – 1922)
  Evy Chlevestanove Dudika (1843 – 1925)
 
 Spouse:
  Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
 
 Children:
  Rozalie Mazac Havelka (1884 – 1949)
  Joe Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
  Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)
  Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
  Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)
  John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
  Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
  Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)
 

 
Inscription:
MARIE MAZAC, NAR, CERVEN 2, 1862, which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939
(which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939), which is Czech for Died on March 21, 1939.

 
Burial: 
Holy Cross Cemetery 
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA 
 

 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007 
Find A Grave Memorial# 21074105

 

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac(from right to left) Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac, “Emilie” & “John” Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

 

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac

Juanita Elizabeth “Punkin” (Frederick)Christ, Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, and Agnes Renie (Frederick) Christ, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1918.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

 

 

[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother], Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905. Emigrated from Vsetine, Moravia in June 1892, and arrived August 1892 in Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Texas area. (courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, TX.)

My Paternal Second Great Grandfather, Jiriho/Jiri “Georg” Mazac, Moravia

Birth:  1843, Moravia, Slovakia
Death:  1923, Moravia, Slovakia
Jiriho or Jiri “Georg” Mazac also spelled Macek.
Nationality: Moravian

Born: 1823 Usti, Vsetin, Moravia.
Christened: 1879 Usti, Vsetin, Moravia.
Religion: Roman Catholic.

Died in 1923 in Usti, Vsetin, Moravia.
Married to Annie Marie Skybarove in 1862 in Moravia.
He was a farmer, she was a homemaker.
He was my Paternal Second Great Grandfather.

Screenshot (117)
Jiri and Annie had Jan “John” Mazac (also Macek) baptized in 1865 in Sobotist, Seneca, Slovakia; and Pavel “Paul” Mazac also spelled Pawel Macek, also baptized in Sobotist, Seneca, Slovakia in 1869.

My Paternal Great Grandfather, Jan “John” Mazac, their son and his wife, Annie Marie “Mary”(Dudika) Mazac emigrated from Moravia in June 1892 to Castle Garden, New York, New York in August 1892. Moved to Texas by ship from New York. source: Mazac Family History book from Mazac Family Reunions, hand written by MAZAC ancestors, and transcribed by Sally Frederick Tudor, President 1995-1998 Mazac Annual Family Reunion, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, 1998.

So far, I have found no record of where in Moravia, that Jiri and Annie (Skybarove) Mazac are buried. 

Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Annie Marie Skybarove Mazac (1844 – 1925)
 
 Children:
  Pavil Mazac (1862 – 1917)
  Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
Burial: Note: Buried in Moravia 
Exact location unknown

Jiriho/Jiri Georg Mazac
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Jun 15, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 91945231

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Jiri &amp; Jan Mazac(Macek) from here

Jiriho (Jiri) “George” Mazac

Birth: 1843, Usti, Vsetin, Morava, Czech Republic 
Death: 1923, Usti, Vsetin, Morava, Czech Republic 
Jiriho or Jiri “George” Mazac also spelled Macek.

Nationality: Moravian Born: 1843 Usti, Vsetin, Moravia.

Christened: 1879 Usti, Vsetine, Morava.

Religion: Roman Catholic.

Died in 1923 in Usti, Vsetin, Morava.

Married to Annie Marie Skybarove in 1862 in Morava.

He was a farmer, she was a homemaker.

He was my 2nd. Paternal Great Grandfather.

Jiri and Annie had Jan “John” Mazac (also Macek) baptized in 1865 in Sobotiste, Seneca, Slovakia; and Pavel “Paul” Mazac also spelled Pawel Macek, also baptized in Sobotiste, Seneca, Slovakia in 1869.

My Paternal Great Grandfather, Jan “John” Mazac, their son and his wife, Annie Marie “Mary”(Dudika) Mazac emigrated from Moravia in June 1892 to Castle Garden, New York, New York in August 1892.

Moved to Granger, Williamson County, Texas.~~~source Mazac Family History book from Mazac Family Reunions…

View original post 106 more words

Saints Cyril and Methodius Catholic Church, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

The Church of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Th...
The Church of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Thessaloniki (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Prague. Saint Cyril and Methodius Church in Ka...
Prague. Saint Cyril and Methodius Church in Karolinenthal (Photo credit: Cornell University Library)
Saints-cyril-and-methodius
Saints-cyril-and-methodius (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: The True Cross. Saint Equal-to-the-Ap...
English: The True Cross. Saint Equal-to-the-Apostles Cyril and Methodius. Khanty-Mansisyk Русский: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Cyril and Methodius, painting by Jan Matejko, 1885
Cyril and Methodius, painting by Jan Matejko, 1885 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Monument to Cyril and Methodius in front of th...
Monument to Cyril and Methodius in front of the SS. Cyril and Methodius National Library in Sofia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Saints Cyril and Methodius
Saints Cyril and Methodius (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saints Cyril and Methodius  Catholic Church, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Historical Marker Text, Granger Texas:
The Czechs/Moravian’s who settled here in the early 1880s initially worshiped in each others’ homes or traveled 12 miles to Taylor, site of the nearest Catholic Church.  As their informal congregation grew so did the community of Granger.  In 1891 they erected a wood frame sanctuary here on land donated by Austinite W. H. Walton, and named their church after the Czech Patron Saints, Cyril and Methodius.
 
During Rev. Frantisek Machan’s brief tenure as Pastor the church formed several fraternal organizations and established a school.  His successor, the Rev. Frantisek Pridal, helped the congregation build a new school building/parish hall in 1912 and replaced the original church building with a brick structure in 1916.

Following the death of the beloved Father Pridal in 1927, the Rev. John Vanicek became Pastor.  He helped many young parishioners enter the Priesthood and Sisterhood and guided several Parishioners into leadership roles in statewide Catholic Fraternal Organizations.
 
In 1948 this church became a part of the newly formed Austin Diocese. A 2-story brick school building was added in 1947.  A recreation center in 1959, and a brick convention in 1960.  The Church continues to play an integral role in church and community affairs.  (1993)

http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/granger/Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius_Catholic_Church.html

My Paternal Great Grandparents Were Jan “John” Mazac, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac

My paternal great grandparents were Jan “John” Mazac, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac. Jan emigrated in 1891 to Ellis IslandNew York, New York, and then by ship to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. Settled in Williamson County, Texas. Marie and their children Rozalie, Robert, and Josef Mazac emigrated in 1892 to  Ellis IslandNew York, New York, and on to Williamson County, Texas. 

They were poor farmers. They were both Catholic. John and Mary had five infants die before leaving Moravia. They had twenty one children together. They had a farm in Granger, Williamson County, Texas from 1892 to 1931. 

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka, & her Mom-Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, boarding train, Granger, Texas,1920’s

Grandpa & Grandma Mazac, Grandma & Grandpa Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back)

(from right to left) Great Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac,

“Emilie” (daughter of Bartholomew Gelner & Veronica Mohel) Kovar & “John” Kovar, & Joe E. Hurta (husband of Effie Mazac  (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Jan (John) Mazac-obitBessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, TX

Image courtesy of the Williamson County Commis...
Image courtesy of the Williamson County Commissioner’s Court (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Seal of Williamson County, Texas
Seal of Williamson County, Texas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Czech-Moravian Kolache Recipe

Moravian Star
Moravian Star (Photo credit: vlasta2)
Moravian Church Motto
Moravian Church Motto (Photo credit: vlasta2)
English: Home made poppy seed kolaches on a plate
English: Home made poppy seed kolaches on a plate (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Moravian Seal, or Agnus Dei, stained ...
English: Moravian Seal, or Agnus Dei, stained glass window in the Rights Chapel at Trinity Moravian Church, Winston-Salem, NC (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Czech Kolaches2

My paternal, Moravian grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac (Frederick) made the best kolaches, that I have ever eaten. I am going to learn to make them. 

Czech Kolaches

Czech-Moravian Kolaches

Czech Kolaches Fillings

Blackberry-Cherry-Kolaches

Kolache /kɵˈlɑːi/ (also spelled kolace, kolach, or kolacky, from the Czech andSlovak plural koláče, sg. koláč) is a type of pastry that holds a dollop of fruit rimmed by a puffy pillow of supple dough.[1] Originating as a semisweet wedding dessert fromCentral Europe, they have become popular in parts of the United States. The wordkolache (колаче) itself means ‘a small cookie’ in Macedonian.

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Czech Christmas Customs And Superstitions

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A Danish version of the Christmas dinner. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Czech folklore is rich in customs and superstitions and there are hundreds of those related to Christmas. The purpose of many of them is to find out what the coming year has in store for the family.

• Christmas Dinner Customs
• The Magical Powers of Foods and Plants
• Foretelling the Future
• Foretelling Marriage
• Money and Wealth
• Other Christmas Customs and Superstitions

Christmas Dinner Customs

Czech Christmas dinner (December 24) is connected with a great number of different customs, rules and superstitions. Very few of them are still observed today, and for good reason. It must have been quite a challenge to put the dinner together and go through with it without a mistake if all the customs were to be followed! Here are some of them:

– No lights should be lit in the house before the first star comes out. After it does, dinner is served.
– The table should be set for an even number of guests. An odd number brings bad luck or death.
– An extra plate can be used to even out the number of guests. An extra plate should also be prepared in case
– an unexpected guest or a person in need comes by the house at dinner time.
– The legs of the table can be tied with a rope to protect the house from thieves and burglars in the coming year.
– No one should sit with their back to the door.
– Christmas dinner should consist of nine courses including soup, bread with honey, carp, potato salad, fruit (dried,
– fresh or canned), dessert (apple strudel or vánočka – Christmas bread), and other foods.
– No alcohol should be served on Christmas Eve.
– No one should ever get up from the Christmas table before dinner is finished. Doing so brings bad luck and death
– in the family.
– Everyone should finish their dinner and leave nothing on the plate.
– The first person to leave the table after dinner will be the first one to die in the coming year – that is why everyone
– should get up from the table at the same time.
– Any leftovers from dinner (crumbs, fishbones, etc.) should be buried around the trees to ensure they will bear lots
– of fruit.
– All household animals should be fed after dinner so that no one goes hungry on Christmas Eve.

The Magical Powers of Foods and Plants

Certain plants, spices and foods are said to have special qualities and have been an important part of Czech Christmas celebrations throughout history.

Garlic
Garlic is an essential part of Christmas that should not be missing at any Christmas dinner. It is believed to provide strength and protection. A bowl of garlic can be placed under the dinner table.

Honey
Honey is believed to guard against evil. A pot of honey can be placed on the dinner table.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms give health and strength. A traditional meal called kuba, prepared from dried mushrooms, barley, garlic, onions, and spices, used to be served as the main meal in the past. Mushroom soup can be served before dinner.

Sheaf of Grain
A bundle of grain dipped in holy water can be used to sprinkle the house to prevent it from burning down in the next year.

Poppyseed, peas, wheat, barley
If given to the hens on Christmas Eve, lots of eggs will be laid in the coming year.

Vánočka (Christmas bread)
Feeding a piece of vánočka to the cows on Christmas Eve will ensure that there will be lots of milk all year.
Putting a few vánočka crumbs in front of the bee hive will make sure that the bees will produce enough honey next year.
Throwing a piece of vánočka into the well will ensure good quality of the water.

Apple
If the goats are given apples on Christmas Eve, their milk will be sweet.

Foretelling the Future

The foretelling of the future and predicting the well-being of the family in the coming year is connected with many popular Christmas customs some of which are still practiced today.

The Floating of Walnut Shells
Little boats are made out of empty walnut shells and each family member places a little burning candle into a shell. Everyone’s shells are then floated on a bowl of water. If the shell makes it across the bowl, its owner will live a long and healthy life. A shell that sinks brings bad luck to its owner.

The Cutting of the Apple
After Christmas dinner, every person present at the table cuts an apple in half (crosswise, from the stem down). Both halves are shown to everyone around the table. If the core is shaped as a star, it means that everyone will get together next year in happiness and health. A four-pointed cross is a bad omen and means that someone at the table will fall ill or die within a year.

The Pouring of Lead
A piece of lead is melted over fire and then poured into a container of water. The resulting shape will tell the pourer’s destiny.

Foretelling Marriage

Lots of Christmas customs help young girls in the family find out if they will get married in the upcoming year.

Cherry Tree Twigs (Barborky)
On December 4, St. Barbora’s Day, an unmarried girl is supposed to cut a twig off of a cherry tree and put it in water. If the twig blooms by Christmas Eve, the girl will marry within a year.

The Throwing of the Shoe
An unmarried girl is supposed to throw a shoe over her shoulder and towards the door. If the shoe lands with the toe pointing towards the door, the girl will marry within a year.

The Shaking of the Elder Tree
An unmarried girl is supposed to shake an elder tree and if a dog barks, she will marry a man who lives in the direction from which the dog bark came.

Money and Wealth

Although Czech Christmas has traditionally been focused on spirituality and family rather than on material possessions, there are a few customs relating to money and wealth.

Fish Scales
Fish scales should be placed under Christmas dinner plates or under the tablecloth to bring wealth to the house. Carrying a fish scale in a wallet all year will ensure that money will not run out.

Other Christmas Customs and Superstitions

– He who fasts all day until dinner will see the golden piglet on the wall.
– After Christmas dinner, no field is to be crossed until the midnight mass. He who does so will die within a year. 
– He who fails to give a present on Christmas Eve will be met with poverty.
– A pregnant woman will know whether she is carrying a boy or a girl once the first Christmas Eve visitor enters the
– house. If the visitor is female, she will have a daughter.

http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_culture/czech_holidays/christmas_superstitions.html

My favorite memory from my Czech-Moravian Grandmother”Bessie” Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick,  was her delicious fruit and poppy seed kolaches that she made. She was a poor farmer’s wife and raised five children on her own.  She was a great cook, and made everything by memory. I never met my paternal grandfather, Charlie Frederick (Karel Fredrich), because he died in 1947 before I was born. My grandmother had very little materially, but she had her Catholic faith and her family. She always had a tree and lots of good food and soda pop for all of us grandchildren. She was very poor, but she always had a little something wrapped up for each of us grandchildren under the tree. We opened our presents from her on Christmas day. We also always had Eggnog. My Czech-Moravian family always celebrated all holidays together. 

Czech-Moravian KolachesCzech_Santa_Christmas_Legends_Steinbach_Nutcracker

 

 

 

czech-republic christmas angel