Vsetin, Moravia the Homeland of my MAZAC Ancestors

Mazac Family Genealogy

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/93/Kostel_evangelick%C3%BD_(Vset%C3%ADn).JPGVsetín CastleOfficial seal of VsetínVsetín is located in Czech Republichttp://www.vyletnik.cz/images/profily/mesto/vsetin/foto/vsetin-524.jpg

Vsetín (Czech pronunciation:[ˈfsɛciːn]) is a town in Zlín Region of the Czech Republic. It has around 28,500 inhabitants and lies on the Vsetínská Bečvariver.

The area around Vsetín, called Vsetínsko, is spread out on the foothills of the Vsetín, Hostýn and Vizovice Highlands around the Bečva River. This area features the remains of log houses and cultural monuments of significant importance mainly in Vsetín itself.

The folk culture has been kept alive by Wallachian song and dance groups for many decades. Originally a small town, Vsetín has become an important centre of industrial, economic, cultural and sports life during the last century.

VB36 Vsetínská Bečva nad mostem v Janové.jpg

Vsetínská Bečva is a river in the Czech Republic, the left tributary of the Bečva River. It originates in the Javorníky mountain range at the elevation of 896 m and flows for 59.38 km to Valašské Meziříčí, where it joins…

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My Maternal Grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac (Frederick)

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas. Shared by me her niece

Bessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas

(from left) Bessie, Effie, & Mary, the Mazac sisters, C. 1913, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Birth:  Oct. 12, 1895
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA

Death:  Mar. 26, 1977
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

My paternal grandmother. Family and friends knew her as Bessie. Hard working Moravian, Catholic, wife of Charlie F. “Karel Fredrick” Frederick. Obtained marriage license in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, and Bessie and Charlie married on 12 October 1914, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. She graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She…

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My Paternal Grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac (Frederick)

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas. Shared by me her niece.

Bessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainie Frederick (Christ), posthumously from their oldest daughter, Houston, Harris, Texas.

(from left) Bessie, Effie, & Mary, the Mazac sisters, C. 1913, Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

Birth:  Oct. 12, 1895
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Death:  Mar. 26, 1977
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

My paternal grandmother. Family and friends knew her as Bessie. Hard working Moravian, Catholic, wife of Charlie F. “Karel Fredrick” Frederick. Obtained marriage license in Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, and Bessie and Charlie married on 12 October 1914, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

She graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She…

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Spa Town of Karlovy Vary – Czech Republic

My Paternal grandfather, Charles “Charlie” Frederick, also known as Karel Fredrich, was from Polom, Moravia.

Pustá Polom (German: Wüstpohlom) is a village in the Moravian-Silesian Region of the Czech Republic. It has around 1,400 inhabitants and lies 12 km from Opava. The village was first mentioned in a written document in 1238.

There are three towns with protected historical centers. Příbor, the birthplace of Sigmund Freud, was an important center of education for northern Moravia from the 17th century to the first half of the 20th. Nový Jičín, founded under the castle of Starý Jičín, has a well preserved central square dating back to the 14th century, with the Žerotínský château nearby. Štramberk is a unique small town nestled in a valley between lime hills, with many timber houses and the Trúba Spire rising on a hill above the town.

There are many castles and châteaus in the region; the most famous being Hradec nad Moravicí, Raduň, Kravaře and Fulnek. Hukvaldy, in a village of the same name under the Moravian-Silesian Beskids, is one the region’s many castle ruins, known for a musical festival dedicated to the composer Leoš Janáček, who was born there. Another well-known castle ruin is Sovinec under the Hrubý Jeseníks. I would love to be able to travel there one day.

Moravia~Homeland Of My MAZAC and DUDIKA Ancestors

Moravia-Mazac-Pink

My Grandmother loved pink, so I created this for her. Below is Granger, Williamson County, Texas and the John & Mary Mazac’s farm. John is the big man with the hat, Mary is the short lady beside him.

(from right to left) Great Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac, “Emilie Gelner” & “John” Kovar, & Joe Hurta (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Grandpa & Grandma Mazac, Grandma & Grandpa Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back)

My Paternal Grandmother, Bessie, graduated from Granger High School in 1913. She worked in the cafeteria for Crosby I.S.D. in the 1950’s. Bessie was a member of the S.P.J.S.T. and K.J.S.T.

She was a faithful member of the SS. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, in Granger, Williamson County, TX; and the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, in Crosby, TX.

My Grandmother honored her Moravian heritage. Her parents emigrated from Moravia in August 1892 to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas.

Bessie & Charlie were hard working Moravian farmers. They moved to Sheldon, TX before 1926, when my Daddy, LeRoy E. Frederick, was born in Crosby, TX. Daddy taught me how to polka.

My poor grandma had a very hard life. She raised her five living children by herself after grandpa Charlie passed away in 1947. She lost a child son, Jerome Frederick, in 1919 in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. She raised Woodie and Charles all their lives. She told me that they were in a car accident, and were never the same again. Charles would not talk at all for years, then when he did start talking grandma wanted him to shut up.

She tended almost an acre of land with her garden. She had a green thumb. She had all kinds of good vegetables and strawberries too! She canned and put up jelly.

Bessie loved music and dancing. Grandma Frederick always had the best kolaches and soda pop for her Grandkids, when they visited. She was a great cook! I loved to climb her trees and pick strawberries out of her garden, that she and the boys (Charles & Woodrow) Frederick helped her tend.
Daughter of Jan “John” & Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac of Granger, Texas.

Resided in Taylor, Williamson County, Texas in 1920, according to the U.S. Census for Williamson County, Texas.

Children: Agnes “Renie” (Christ), LeRoy “Lee” Eugene, Juanita “Punkin” (Christ), Woodrow “Woodie”, and Charles “Chas” Frederick.

She raised the children by herself after 1947, when Grandpa Charlie died of Stomach Cancer.

Grandma Bessie worked for the Crosby ISD in the cafeteria for years. Everyone loved her. Died of hardening of the arteries and Diabetes.

Grandma Bessie liked pink. She told my mother and me that she liked artificial flowers–because they didn’t die. And, she made my mother promise her, that when she died, mother would make sure that all her grandchildren came to her funeral. Of course, we all did. Having flowers at her families gravesides was important to her.

I volunteered to sponsor the online Sacred Heart Catholic Cemetery to honor her. Grandma Bessie & Grandpa Charlie and Uncle Woodie, Uncle Charles, and Aunt Rainie are all laid to rest there.

Grandma Bessie even as poor as she was, always made sure that all nine (9) of her Grandchildren got something for Christmas. 

Charlie & Bessie Frederick, October 12, 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Charles “Charlie” (aka Karel Fredrick) & Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, 12 Oct. 1914, Granger, Williamson County, Texas. ~~photo courtesy of Agnes Rainnie Frederick (Christ) their daughter.

 

Great Moravia~~~Homeland of Moravian Ancestors

Bratislava Castle is one of the most prominent structures in its namesake city.

Great Moravia (Czech: Velká Morava, Slovak: Veľká Morava), also Moravia or Great Moravian Empire,[4] was the first West Slavic state to emerge from “the most powerful tribal area in Central Europe“.[5][vague] Its core territories were located on the northern Morava River along the present-day border of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Theories of a Great Moravia situated in the region of the southern Great Morava River have not been widely accepted. The exact date of the founding of the Moravian state is controversial, but it is supposed that the state building process was completed in the early 830s under Mojmir I (r. 820s/830s–846), who is the first known Moravian ruler.

Mojmir and his successor, Rastislav (r. 846–870), initially acknowledged the suzerainty of the Carolingian monarchs, but their fights for independence caused a series of armed conflicts with East Francia beginning in the 840s. Moravia reached its largest territorial extent under Svatopluk I (r. 870–894), who was occasionally styled as king in contemporaneous sources. Although the borders of his empire cannot be exactly determined, he controlled the core territories of Moravia as well as other neighboring regions, including Bohemiaand parts of present-day Hungary and Poland, for some period of his reign. Separatism and internal conflicts emerging after Svatopluk’s death contributed to the fall of Moravia, which was overrun by the Hungarians. The exact date of Moravia’s collapse is unknown, but it occurred in the period between 902 and 907.

Moravia experienced significant cultural development after the arrival in 863 of the mission of Saints Cyril and Methodius, initiated by Prince Rastislav, which introduced a system of writing (the Glagolitic alphabet) and Slavonic liturgy, the latter eventually formally approved by Pope Adrian II.[6] The Glagolitic script and its successor Cyrillic were disseminated to other Slavic countries (particularly Balkan states and Kievan Rus’), charting a new path in their cultural development.

My Paternal Great Grandmother~Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika)~Moravia

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka, & her Mom-Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, boarding train, Granger, TX, c. 1920’s.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

Birth: 

Apr. 2, 1862

 Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia

Death:  Mar. 21, 1939
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA 

My Paternal Great Grandmother, Daughter of Tomas “Tom” Dudika (also known as Dudik) & Evy “Eve” (Chlevestanove) Dudika of Mala Bystrici, Novy Jiovin, Moravia.Wife of Jan “John” Mazac, Mother of 21 children.
Emigrated on 19 January 1892 from Moravia to Ellis Island, New York, New York. Moved to Texas to meet her husband, John Mazac.

[LEO BACA’S BOOK ON CZECH IMMIGRATION: 
MARIE MAZAC, AGE 29, ARRIVED ON JAN. 19, 1892 IN NEW YORK ON THE SHIP EIDER FROM MORAVIA, WITH ROZALIE AGE 8, ROBERT AGE 2, AND JOSEF AGE 1/2 [6 MONTHS] BOUND FOR TEXAS. IMMIGRATION PAPERS SHOW MAZAC, MARIE, DCERA TOMASE DUDIKA, DOMKARE V MALE BYSTRICI A JEHO MANZELKY EVY CHLEVESTANOVE.]

Settled in Granger, Taylor, and Corn Hill, Williamson County, Texas areas. 

Children: Rosalie, Albert, Anton, Andrew, Joe #1, Steve, Johnnie, Robert Albert, Frank, Johnny #2, Marie, Elizabeth Annie (Bessie), Emma, Effie, Baby (sex unknown), John Joseph, Alberta “Bertha”, Olga, Frank Joseph, and Vlasta Mary Mazac.

Loving wife, Mother, Grandmother, and Great Grandmother.
Hardworking Czech-Moravian, farmer’s wife, and a devout Catholic. Member of the SPJST. 

Member of the St.Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church in Granger, Williamson County, Texas. Mary & John Mazac helped build the St. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

Note: Burial Information taken from Williamson County Cemetery Book, Vol.1. 

Family links: 
 Parents:
  Tomas Dudika (1842 – 1922)
  Evy Chlevestanove Dudika (1843 – 1925)
 
 Spouse:
  Jan Mazac (1863 – 1931)
 
 Children:
  Rozalie Mazac Havelka (1884 – 1949)
  Joe Frank Mazac (1891 – 1959)
  Marie Mazac Motloch (1894 – 1968)
  Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick (1895 – 1977)
  Effie Mazac Hurta (1898 – 1979)
  John Jerry Mazac (1899 – 1966)
  Frank Joseph Mazac (1902 – 1990)
  Vlasta Mary Mazac Konecny (1904 – 1999)
 

 
Inscription:
MARIE MAZAC, NAR, CERVEN 2, 1862, which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939
(which means Born on April 2, 1862, and ZEM, BREZNA 21, 1939), which is Czech for Died on March 21, 1939.

 
Burial: 
Holy Cross Cemetery 
Granger
Williamson County
Texas, USA 
 

 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007 
Find A Grave Memorial# 21074105
 

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac(from right to left) Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac, “Emilie” & “John” Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

 

Annie Marie Mary <i>Dudika</i> Mazac

Juanita Elizabeth “Punkin” (Frederick)Christ, Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, and Agnes Renie (Frederick) Christ, Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1918.

Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

 

 

[first arrow in back row is my Grandmother], Bessie Annie Mazac, [second arrow in back is my Great Grandfather], Jan “John” Mazac, and [third arrow and sitting in chair is my Great Grandmother], Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac in Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1905. Emigrated from Vsetine, Moravia in June 1892, and arrived August 1892 in Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. They were hardworking farmers who settled in the Granger and Corn Hill, Texas area. (courtesy of the “1995 Mazac Reunion Book” held by Sally Frederick Tudor, Houston, TX.)

Jiriho “George” Mazac

Texas Tudor's Memorials

Jiri &amp; Jan Mazac(Macek) from here

Jiriho (Jiri) “George” Mazac

Birth: 1843, Usti, Vsetin, Morava, Czech Republic 
Death: 1923, Usti, Vsetin, Morava, Czech Republic 
Jiriho or Jiri “George” Mazac also spelled Macek.

Nationality: Moravian Born: 1843 Usti, Vsetin, Moravia.

Christened: 1879 Usti, Vsetine, Morava.

Religion: Roman Catholic.

Died in 1923 in Usti, Vsetin, Morava.

Married to Annie Marie Skybarove in 1862 in Morava.

He was a farmer, she was a homemaker.

He was my 2nd. Paternal Great Grandfather.

Jiri and Annie had Jan “John” Mazac (also Macek) baptized in 1865 in Sobotiste, Seneca, Slovakia; and Pavel “Paul” Mazac also spelled Pawel Macek, also baptized in Sobotiste, Seneca, Slovakia in 1869.

My Paternal Great Grandfather, Jan “John” Mazac, their son and his wife, Annie Marie “Mary”(Dudika) Mazac emigrated from Moravia in June 1892 to Castle Garden, New York, New York in August 1892.

Moved to Granger, Williamson County, Texas.~~~source Mazac Family History book from Mazac Family Reunions…

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Saints Cyril and Methodius Catholic Church, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

The Church of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Th...
The Church of Saints Cyril and Methodius in Thessaloniki (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Prague. Saint Cyril and Methodius Church in Ka...
Prague. Saint Cyril and Methodius Church in Karolinenthal (Photo credit: Cornell University Library)
Saints-cyril-and-methodius
Saints-cyril-and-methodius (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: The True Cross. Saint Equal-to-the-Ap...
English: The True Cross. Saint Equal-to-the-Apostles Cyril and Methodius. Khanty-Mansisyk Русский: Животворящий Крест Господень. Святые равноапостольные Кирилл и Мефодий. Ханты-Мансийск (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Cyril and Methodius, painting by Jan Matejko, 1885
Cyril and Methodius, painting by Jan Matejko, 1885 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Monument to Cyril and Methodius in front of th...
Monument to Cyril and Methodius in front of the SS. Cyril and Methodius National Library in Sofia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Saints Cyril and Methodius
Saints Cyril and Methodius (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saints Cyril and Methodius  Catholic Church, Granger, Williamson County, Texas

Historical Marker text
Granger Texas 
The Czechs/Moravians who settled here in the early 1880s initially worshiped in each others’ homes or traveled 12 miles to Taylor, site of the nearest Catholic Church.  As their informal congregation grew so did the community of Granger.  In 1891 they erected a wood frame sanctuary here on land donated by Austinite W. H. Walton, and named their church after the Czech Patron Saints, Cyril and Methodius.
 
During Rev. Frantisek Machan’s brief tenure as Pastor the church formed several fraternal organizations and established a school.  His successor, the Rev. Frantisek Pridal, helped the congregation build a new school building/parish hall in 1912 and replace the original church building with a brick structure in 1916.

Following the death of the beloved Father Pridal in 1927, the Rev. John Vanicek became Pastor.  He helped many young parishioners enter the Priesthood and Sisterhood and guided several Parishioners into leadership roles in statewide Catholic Fraternal Organizations.
 
In 1948 this church became a part of the newly formed Austin Diocese. A 2-story brick school building was added in 1947.  A recreation center in 1959, and a brick convention in 1960.  The Church continues to play an integral role in church and community affairs.  (1993)

http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/granger/Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius_Catholic_Church.html

My Paternal Great Grandparents Were Jan “John” Mazac, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac

My paternal great grandparents were Jan “John” Mazac, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac. Jan emigrated in 1891 to Ellis IslandNew York, New York, and then by ship to Galveston, Galveston County, Texas. Settled in Williamson County, Texas. Marie and their children Rozalie, Robert, and Josef Mazac emigrated in 1892 to  Ellis IslandNew York, New York, and on to Williamson County, Texas. 

They were poor farmers. They were both Catholic. John and Mary had five infants die before leaving Moravia. They had twenty one children together. They had a farm in Granger, Williamson County, Texas from 1892 to 1931. 

Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac, Rosie Havelka, & her Mom-Rozalie (Mazac) Havelka, boarding train, Granger, Texas,1920’s

Grandpa & Grandma Mazac, Grandma & Grandpa Kovar, & Uncle Joe Hurta (in back)

(from right to left) Great Grandpa “Jan” & Grandma “Marie” Mazac,

“Emilie” (daughter of Bartholomew Gelner & Veronica Mohel) Kovar & “John” Kovar, & Joe E. Hurta (husband of Effie Mazac  (in back), Granger, Williamson County, Texas, c. 1920’s.

Jan (John) Mazac-obitBessie, Joe, Effie, & Frank Mazac, Nov. 1912, Granger, TX

Image courtesy of the Williamson County Commis...
Image courtesy of the Williamson County Commissioner’s Court (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Seal of Williamson County, Texas
Seal of Williamson County, Texas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Czech-Moravian Kolache Recipe

Moravian Star
Moravian Star (Photo credit: vlasta2)
Moravian Church Motto
Moravian Church Motto (Photo credit: vlasta2)
English: Home made poppy seed kolaches on a plate
English: Home made poppy seed kolaches on a plate (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Moravian Seal, or Agnus Dei, stained ...
English: Moravian Seal, or Agnus Dei, stained glass window in the Rights Chapel at Trinity Moravian Church, Winston-Salem, NC (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Czech Kolaches2

My paternal, Moravian grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac (Frederick) made the best kolaches, that I have ever eaten. I am going to learn to make them. 

Czech Kolaches

Czech-Moravian Kolaches

Czech Kolaches Fillings

Blackberry-Cherry-Kolaches

Kolache /kɵˈlɑːi/ (also spelled kolace, kolach, or kolacky, from the Czech andSlovak plural koláče, sg. koláč) is a type of pastry that holds a dollop of fruit rimmed by a puffy pillow of supple dough.[1] Originating as a semisweet wedding dessert fromCentral Europe, they have become popular in parts of the United States. The wordkolache (колаче) itself means ‘a small cookie’ in Macedonian.

Related articles

Czech Christmas Customs And Superstitions

English: Czech christmas cake (Vánoce is Chris...
English: Czech christmas cake (Vánoce is Christmas). Polski: Czeska chałka bożonarodzeniowa “Vánočka” (Vánoce jest Boże Narodzenie). Česky: Česká vánočka. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Czech Cuisine
Czech Cuisine (Photo credit: maerzbow)
A Danish version of the Christmas dinner.
A Danish version of the Christmas dinner. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Bulgarian Christmas Eve dinner spread with pum...
Bulgarian Christmas Eve dinner spread with pumpkin (tikvenik) banitsa, sarma, Russian salad and more. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
traditional Christmas Eve supper in Poland - d...
traditional Christmas Eve supper in Poland – dishes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Czech folklore is rich in customs and superstitions and there are hundreds of those related to Christmas. The purpose of many of them is to find out what the coming year has in store for the family.

• Christmas Dinner Customs
• The Magical Powers of Foods and Plants
• Foretelling the Future
• Foretelling Marriage
• Money and Wealth
• Other Christmas Customs and Superstitions

Christmas Dinner Customs

Czech Christmas dinner (December 24) is connected with a great number of different customs, rules and superstitions. Very few of them are still observed today, and for good reason. It must have been quite a challenge to put the dinner together and go through with it without a mistake if all the customs were to be followed! Here are some of them:

– No lights should be lit in the house before the first star comes out. After it does, dinner is served.
– The table should be set for an even number of guests. An odd number brings bad luck or death.
– An extra plate can be used to even out the number of guests. An extra plate should also be prepared in case
– an unexpected guest or a person in need comes by the house at dinner time.
– The legs of the table can be tied with a rope to protect the house from thieves and burglars in the coming year.
– No one should sit with their back to the door.
– Christmas dinner should consist of nine courses including soup, bread with honey, carp, potato salad, fruit (dried,
– fresh or canned), dessert (apple strudel or vánočka – Christmas bread), and other foods.
– No alcohol should be served on Christmas Eve.
– No one should ever get up from the Christmas table before dinner is finished. Doing so brings bad luck and death
– in the family.
– Everyone should finish their dinner and leave nothing on the plate.
– The first person to leave the table after dinner will be the first one to die in the coming year – that is why everyone
– should get up from the table at the same time.
– Any leftovers from dinner (crumbs, fishbones, etc.) should be buried around the trees to ensure they will bear lots
– of fruit.
– All household animals should be fed after dinner so that no one goes hungry on Christmas Eve.

The Magical Powers of Foods and Plants

Certain plants, spices and foods are said to have special qualities and have been an important part of Czech Christmas celebrations throughout history.

Garlic
Garlic is an essential part of Christmas that should not be missing at any Christmas dinner. It is believed to provide strength and protection. A bowl of garlic can be placed under the dinner table.

Honey
Honey is believed to guard against evil. A pot of honey can be placed on the dinner table.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms give health and strength. A traditional meal called kuba, prepared from dried mushrooms, barley, garlic, onions, and spices, used to be served as the main meal in the past. Mushroom soup can be served before dinner.

Sheaf of Grain
A bundle of grain dipped in holy water can be used to sprinkle the house to prevent it from burning down in the next year.

Poppyseed, peas, wheat, barley
If given to the hens on Christmas Eve, lots of eggs will be laid in the coming year.

Vánočka (Christmas bread)
Feeding a piece of vánočka to the cows on Christmas Eve will ensure that there will be lots of milk all year.
Putting a few vánočka crumbs in front of the bee hive will make sure that the bees will produce enough honey next year.
Throwing a piece of vánočka into the well will ensure good quality of the water.

Apple
If the goats are given apples on Christmas Eve, their milk will be sweet.

Foretelling the Future

The foretelling of the future and predicting the well-being of the family in the coming year is connected with many popular Christmas customs some of which are still practiced today.

The Floating of Walnut Shells
Little boats are made out of empty walnut shells and each family member places a little burning candle into a shell. Everyone’s shells are then floated on a bowl of water. If the shell makes it across the bowl, its owner will live a long and healthy life. A shell that sinks brings bad luck to its owner.

The Cutting of the Apple
After Christmas dinner, every person present at the table cuts an apple in half (crosswise, from the stem down). Both halves are shown to everyone around the table. If the core is shaped as a star, it means that everyone will get together next year in happiness and health. A four-pointed cross is a bad omen and means that someone at the table will fall ill or die within a year.

The Pouring of Lead
A piece of lead is melted over fire and then poured into a container of water. The resulting shape will tell the pourer’s destiny.

Foretelling Marriage

Lots of Christmas customs help young girls in the family find out if they will get married in the upcoming year.

Cherry Tree Twigs (Barborky)
On December 4, St. Barbora’s Day, an unmarried girl is supposed to cut a twig off of a cherry tree and put it in water. If the twig blooms by Christmas Eve, the girl will marry within a year.

The Throwing of the Shoe
An unmarried girl is supposed to throw a shoe over her shoulder and towards the door. If the shoe lands with the toe pointing towards the door, the girl will marry within a year.

The Shaking of the Elder Tree
An unmarried girl is supposed to shake an elder tree and if a dog barks, she will marry a man who lives in the direction from which the dog bark came.

Money and Wealth

Although Czech Christmas has traditionally been focused on spirituality and family rather than on material possessions, there are a few customs relating to money and wealth.

Fish Scales
Fish scales should be placed under Christmas dinner plates or under the tablecloth to bring wealth to the house. Carrying a fish scale in a wallet all year will ensure that money will not run out.

Other Christmas Customs and Superstitions

– He who fasts all day until dinner will see the golden piglet on the wall.
– After Christmas dinner, no field is to be crossed until the midnight mass. He who does so will die within a year. 
– He who fails to give a present on Christmas Eve will be met with poverty.
– A pregnant woman will know whether she is carrying a boy or a girl once the first Christmas Eve visitor enters the
– house. If the visitor is female, she will have a daughter.

http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_culture/czech_holidays/christmas_superstitions.html

My favorite memory from my Czech-Moravian Grandmother”Bessie” Elizabeth Annie Mazac Frederick,  was her delicious fruit and poppy seed kolaches that she made. She was a poor farmer’s wife and raised five children on her own.  She was a great cook, and made everything by memory. I never met my paternal grandfather, Charlie Frederick (Karel Fredrich), because he died in 1947 before I was born. My grandmother had very little materially, but she had her Catholic faith and her family. She always had a tree and lots of good food and soda pop for all of us grandchildren. She was very poor, but she always had a little something wrapped up for each of us grandchildren under the tree. We opened our presents from her on Christmas day. We also always had Eggnog. My Czech-Moravian family always celebrated all holidays together. 

Czech-Moravian KolachesCzech_Santa_Christmas_Legends_Steinbach_Nutcracker

 

 

 

czech-republic christmas angel

My Paternal Moravian Grandparents: Charlie Frederick & Elizabeth “Bessie” Annie (Mazac) Frederick

Granger Church

The Williamson County Courthouse located at 30...Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius_Catholic_Church_Granger-Texas

Image courtesy of the Williamson County Commis...

Seal of Williamson County, Texas

My Paternal Grandmother was Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac Frederick from Granger, Williamson County, Texas. They married on October 12, 1914 at the St. Cyril & Methodius Catholic Church, Granger, Texas.  Charlie and Bessie were both Catholics.

My Grandmother loved pink, so I posted the pink background of the Moravian-Czech flower. She liked artificial because she said they never die.

She lost my Grandfather in 1947 to Stomach Cancer, and she had a hard life raising her five children on her own. Grandma was an excellent cook, a good mother, and she also grew a garden with her sons, Woodrow and Charles for years to help feed the family. 

Charles F. “Charlie” Frederick also known as Karel Fredrich, and Charles Fredrick, was born on April 20, 1892 in Mala Lhota, Vsetina, Moravia and he emigrated from Moravia in 1894 to New York, and then on to Austin, Travis County, Texas. His last known residence according to his naturalization papers was in Pusta Polom, Ostrava, Moravian-Silesia. He was a poor farmer and a cobbler. My father told me that he helped the other Moravians to learn English. He was an avid reader, and read his Bible everyday. 

Obec Pusta Polom, Ostrava, Moravian-Silesia

Pusta_Polom_CoA_Moravia

He received his American citizenship papers by serving in the Czech-Slovak Army during World War I in France.  According to the  1930 U. S. Census for Harris County, Texas, Charles Fredrick emigrated in 1894 from Czechoslovakia. 

Bessie was born on October 12, 1895 in Granger, Williamson County, Texas.

Bessie’s parents, Jan “John” Mazac emigrated in 1891, and Annie Marie “Mary” (Dudika) Mazac emigrated in 1892 to Ellis Island, New York, New York. They were poor tenant farm laborers. 

Seal of Travis County, Texas
Seal of Travis County, Texas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)