Moravian Slovakia (Czech: Moravské Slovácko) or Slovácko is a cultural region in the southeastern part of the Czech Republic

My Paternal Grandfather, Karel Fredrick also known as Charles Frederick, was born in Mala Lehota, Moravia on 20 April 1892. My Paternal Great Grandfather, Jan Mazac was born on 28 April 1863 in Usti, Vsetine, Moravia.

Moravian Slovakia (Czech: Moravské Slovácko) or Slovácko is a cultural region in the southeastern part of the Czech Republic, Moravia on the border with Slovakia (Czech: Slovensko) and Austria, known for its characteristic folklore, music, wine, costumes and traditions. The area forms part of both the Zlín and South Moravian administrative regions.

Its most important center is the town of Uherské Hradiště which is located on the Morava River. Other important population centers include Uherský Brod, Břeclav, Hodonín, Strážnice and Kyjov. In the 9th century the region of Moravian Slovakia was the centre of the Great Moravian empire.

Native Moravians speak Moravian dialects of the Czech language, and the dialects native to this region are influenced by neighboring Slovak speakers, hence the name “Moravian Slovakia.” Due to these cultural and linguistic links to Slovakia, many ethnographers until 20th century used to consider Moravian Slovaks as a people which politically belonged to Moravia and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown but ethnographically and culturally to the Slovak ethnic group. Historically, there were also significant numbers of German speakers who also influenced local speech.

Moravians (Czech: Moravané or colloquially Moraváci) are the modern West Slavic inhabitants of the historical land of Moravia, the easternmost part of the Czech Republic, which includes Moravian Slovakia. They speak the two main groups of Moravian dialects (the Central and the Eastern), the transitional Bohemian-Moravian dialect subgroup and standard Czech. There are attempts by few Moravian individuals and organizations to create a distinct “Moravian language”.